Biotechnology Sector

Profitable companies and non-Profitable Biotech companies (rising stars) have developed innovative drugs for treatment of chronic and non chronic diseases. In the next five years the distinction between mature biotech companies and large global pharma is likely to disappear as investment in R&D and acquisition start delivering and Market Cap match the large global pharma. Dividend and consolidation could be the future drivers and continue to attract long term investors. Optimism prevails around the future of this sector as a whole which was reflected in the unprecedented rally in shares in 2012.

This trend continued in the next five years driven by launch of Innovative drugs catering to unmet needs in Alzheimer’s, HCV, osteoporosis, RA, Psoriasis, MS, Dyslipidemia, Cystic fibrosis, Cancer and orphan diseases. Drug approvals and label expansion of existing portfolio of launched drugs and data from late stage pipeline drugs should maintain the growth momentum and investors interest.

The early part of the previous decade (2010-20) was spent recovering from the big acquisitions made by this sector but followed by the exercising of some restrain for similar large acquisitions as investors wanted to see the returns reflected in the top-line and EPS. However in- licensing of early or mid stage compounds or small acquisitions continued since the Rising Stars kept throwing the bait by taking risks and innovate using novel technology platforms or validating novel targets for treating diseases.

Patent expiry impact was also modest as majority had “not so easy to copy” biologics and other drugs in their portfolio. They, however were not complacent and were not leaving any stones unturned to meet the challenges as well as exploring emerging market opportunities with local partners. Favorable regulatory environment finally saw biosimilar mAbs entry in regulated markets  The optimism of biosimilar players is reflected in the maturing pipeline. Para IV Filing from other generic players continues to pour leaving room for surprises and volatility.

Moving forward the sector should see a strategic rise of the digital mindset and further adoption of transformative and augumentative technologies. While mergers & acquisitions can still expect a sharper focus despite being more traditional, external innovation should result in a meaningful shift in culture through innovative and creative partnerships with both new entrants and less traditional companies.

There will be an increasing demand for even more transparency and disclosure and a need for real relationship-driven partnerships will encroach across all sector stakeholders including regulators, patients, advocacy groups and also to outsourcing players critical to the supply chain. Data will be a dominating force behind new revenue models and crucial to understanding and delivering an exceptional patient experience. Pricing will continue to exert much pressure, increasing access to drugs, growth of gene and cell therapies, and uncertain trade policies will further change the dynamics of the market.

Industry News

  • Pharmaceutical companies with the most orphan drugs
    by DrugPatentWatch – Make Better Decisions on July 28, 2021 at 4:09 am

    Orphan drug exclusivity is granted to drugs addressing rare ‘orphan diseases’ — those affecting fewer than 200,000 Americans. The protection granted to orphan drugs is quite strong. The FDA is… The post Pharmaceutical companies with the most orphan dru... The post Pharmaceutical companies with the most orphan drugs appeared first on Biotechblog.

  • AbbVie hits go on $1B re-upped Calico deal as the Google life science spin-out continues I-O, neuro push
    by Ben Adams on July 27, 2021 at 1:10 pm

    AbbVie hits go on $1B re-upped Calico deal as the Google life science spin-out continues I-O, neuro push badams Tue, 07/27/2021 - 09:10

  • Merck women's health spinout Organon bags preterm labor drug ahead of phase 3
    by Nick Paul on July 27, 2021 at 12:19 pm

    Merck women's health spinout Organon bags preterm labor drug ahead of phase 3 ntaylor Tue, 07/27/2021 - 08:19

  • Artios raises $153M to fund DNA damage repair clinical trials
    by Nick Paul on July 27, 2021 at 11:43 am

    Artios raises $153M to fund DNA damage repair clinical trials ntaylor Tue, 07/27/2021 - 07:43

  • AstraZeneca teams up with Regeneron for obesity-busting drug pact focused on genetics
    by Ben Adams on July 27, 2021 at 11:36 am

    AstraZeneca teams up with Regeneron for obesity-busting drug pact focused on genetics badams Tue, 07/27/2021 - 07:36

  • Using the Full Potential of Circulating Tumor Cells for Oncology Clinical Trials
    by Ute Boronowsky on July 27, 2021 at 8:00 am

    Circulating tumor cell counts are powerful prognostic factors for cancer patients. Recent research has found that they can be quite heterogeneous – similar to the cells of the tumor they shed from. Novel tools that analyze the different phenotypes can reveal their full potential as biomarkers in oncology clinical trials. Circulating tumor cells are shed from solid tumors and released into the bloodstream. Traveling through the body, they can develop into metastases. Their presence in the blood may, therefore, provide an essential prognostic indicator in cancer diagnostics.  Current diagnostic methods determine tumor cell counts per unit of volume. Below a specific threshold value, the patient is considered to have a good prognosis. Along the same line, these tumor cells are used as biomarkers in oncology clinical studies: If the new treatment is effective, circulating tumor cell counts are expected to decrease. Tissue or liquid biopsy? Jesus Garcia, Scientific Liaison, Precision for Medicine Circulating tumor cells are isolated from liquid biopsy samples – typically blood samples. The post Using the Full Potential of Circulating Tumor Cells for Oncology Clinical Trials appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • New patent for Zogenix Inc drug FINTEPLA
    by DrugPatentWatch – Make Better Decisions on July 27, 2021 at 4:09 am

    Annual Drug Patent Expirations for FINTEPLA Fintepla is a drug marketed by Zogenix Inc and is included in one NDA. It is available from one supplier. There are ten patents… The post New patent for Zogenix Inc drug FINTEPLA appeared first on DrugPatentW... The post New patent for Zogenix Inc drug FINTEPLA appeared first on Biotechblog.

  • New patent for Zurex Pharma drug ZURAGARD
    by DrugPatentWatch – Make Better Decisions on July 27, 2021 at 4:09 am

    Annual Drug Patent Expirations for ZURAGARD Zuragard is a drug marketed by Zurex Pharma and is included in one NDA. The generic ingredient in ZURAGARD is isopropyl alcohol. Additional details… The post New patent for Zurex Pharma drug ZURAGARD appeared... The post New patent for Zurex Pharma drug ZURAGARD appeared first on Biotechblog.

  • New patent for Novartis drug XIIDRA
    by DrugPatentWatch – Make Better Decisions on July 27, 2021 at 4:09 am

    Annual Drug Patent Expirations for XIIDRA Xiidra is a drug marketed by Novartis and is included in one NDA. It is available from two suppliers. There are fifteen patents protecting… The post New patent for Novartis drug XIIDRA appeared first on DrugPat... The post New patent for Novartis drug XIIDRA appeared first on Biotechblog.

  • Most prolific drug patent challengers
    by DrugPatentWatch – Make Better Decisions on July 27, 2021 at 4:09 am

    This chart shows the generic pharmaceutical companies that had the most successful drug patent challenges from 2016 to 2021. Companies that successfully challenge patents on branded drugs are granted six… The post Most prolific drug patent challengers ... The post Most prolific drug patent challengers appeared first on Biotechblog.

  • Prothena rolls out preclinical data for anti-amyloid Alzheimer's candidate to rival Biogen's Aduhelm
    by Kyle LaHucik on July 26, 2021 at 5:21 pm

    Prothena rolls out preclinical data for anti-amyloid Alzheimer's candidate to rival Biogen's Aduhelm klahucik Mon, 07/26/2021 - 13:21

  • Exosome formulation developed to deliver antibodies for choroidal neovascularization therapy
    by Bioengineer on July 26, 2021 at 3:40 pm

    Credit: TIAN Ying and ZHANG Fan Researchers from the Institute of Process Engineering (IPE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital and the University of Queensland have developed a new formulation based on regulatory T-cell exosomes (rEXS) to deliver vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibodies for choroidal neovascularization therapy. The study was published

  • Improving air quality reduces dementia risk, multiple studies suggest
    by Bioengineer on July 26, 2021 at 2:43 pm

    Credit: Alzheimer’s Association DENVER, JULY 26, 2021 — Improving air quality may improve cognitive function and reduce dementia risk, according to several studies reported today at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference® (AAIC®) 2021 in Denver and virtually. Previous reports have linked long-term air pollution exposure with accumulation of Alzheimer’s disease-related brain plaques, but this is

  • Europe’s TCR Therapy Scene Gains Traction with €40M Series B
    by Jonathan Smith on July 26, 2021 at 2:06 pm

    Swedish firm Anocca’s fundraising is the first major venture capital round to go to a European TCR therapy developer this year; another sign that the technology is gaining momentum. Last year was a busy one for companies developing cell therapies for cancer based on engineering T-cell receptors (TCRs), known as TCR or TCR-T cell therapies. One example from the European biotech sector was the German firm Immatics, which entered the Nasdaq stock market in July 2020. Meanwhile, hefty Series A rounds were closed by T-knife in Germany and Neogene in the Netherlands. Over the first half of 2021, however, Europe has seen few venture rounds going to TCR-T developers — a pattern also reflected in the Asia-Pacific region. But it is in big contrast to the US, which has already had at least three venture capital rounds raised by TCR-T companies. There have also been multiple initial public offerings in the US from TCR-T developers — the latest of which was closed at around €85M ($100M) by TScan Therapeutics earlier this month. The post Europe’s TCR Therapy Scene Gains Traction with €40M Series B appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • Elsevier partners with American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics to publish Genetics in Medicine
    by Bioengineer on July 26, 2021 at 1:38 pm

    Collaboration signifies strong commitment by all stakeholders to maintain the journal’s high standards and expand its global prominence Credit: ACMG New York, July 26, 2021 – The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG), the only nationally recognized US medical professional organization solely dedicated to improving health through the practice of medical genetics and

  • AbbVie posts new data on drug that could replace glasses or contacts for age-related far-sightedness
    by Nick Paul on July 26, 2021 at 12:30 pm

    AbbVie posts new data on drug that could replace glasses or contacts for age-related far-sightedness ntaylor Mon, 07/26/2021 - 08:30

  • The Underlying Scientific Issues Making Biotech Startups Fail
    by External Contributor on July 26, 2021 at 10:50 am

    Biotech startups rely heavily on the science behind their products. There are a series of common scientific challenges that may initially be overlooked but can determine the success or failure of a young startup. Recently, a colleague drew my attention to a report about the top reasons a startup company might fail. After postmortems were carried out, failure was usually found to be due to an unwanted product, a lack of cash, and not having the right team, in that order. Prior to joining Sean O Sullivan Ventures (SOSV) and its startup accelerator RebelBio, I had spent 15 years as a scientist, working both on the lab bench and at the business interface of other biotech startups. During that time, I became familiar with a set of problems often only recognized from the scientist’s perspective that seemed to arise in most companies to varying degrees. So when I shared the report with a number of former colleagues and other scientists from the broader community, we came to the conclusion that the factors outlined by the report are indeed correct, The post The Underlying Scientific Issues Making Biotech Startups Fail appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • Bayer poaches Ruettinger from Roche to head up early cancer R&D
    by Nick Paul on July 26, 2021 at 10:05 am

    Bayer poaches Ruettinger from Roche to head up early cancer R&D ntaylor Mon, 07/26/2021 - 06:05

  • Juicy past of favorite Okinawan fruit revealed
    by Bioengineer on July 26, 2021 at 9:06 am

    Credit: Hidekazu Sumi Citrus fruits from the mandarin family have important commercial value but how their diversity arose has been something of a mystery Researchers analyzed the genomes of the East Asian varieties and found a second center of diversity in the Ryukyu Islands along with the previously known center in the mountains of southern

  • Oncotarget: TERT and its binding protein: overexpression of GABPA/B in gliomas
    by Bioengineer on July 26, 2021 at 5:06 am

    This Oncotarget study confirms the upregulation of TERT in primary glioblastomas while all GABP proteins rise with the malignancy of the gliomas Credit: Correspondence to – Marco Timmer – marco.timmer@uk-koeln.de Oncotarget published “TERT and its binding protein: overexpression of GABPA/B in high grade gliomas” which reported that all GA-binding proteins progress through the glioma grades

  • Oncotarget: Replication-stress sensitivity in breast cancer cells
    by Bioengineer on July 26, 2021 at 4:58 am

    Taken together these Oncotarget findings show that the CTD and OD domains of mtp53 R273H play critical roles in mutant p53 GOF that pertain to processes associated with DNA replication Credit: Correspondence to – Jill Bargonetti – bargonetti@genectr.hunter.cuny.edu Oncotarget published “Frame-shift mediated reduction of gain-of-function p53 R273H and deletion of the R273H C-terminus in breast

  • Goal-setting and positive parent-child relationships reduce risk of youth vaping
    by Bioengineer on July 26, 2021 at 4:38 am

    Credit: UPMC PITTSBURGH, July 26, 2021 – Adolescents who set goals for their future and those with strong parental support are less likely to use e-cigarettes and other tobacco products, according to a study by UPMC Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh and University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine physician-scientists. The research, published today in the journal

  • Development of a novel technology to check body temperature with smartphone camera
    by Bioengineer on July 26, 2021 at 4:18 am

    Technology for low-cost, thermal-imaging sensors that operate well at temperatures as high as 100 °C has been developed. Expected to be actively used in thermal-imaging applications in smartphones and autonomous vehicles Credit: Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) Thermal-imaging sensors that detect and capture images of the heat signatures of human bodies and other objects

  • New US and German collaboration aims to produce green hydrogen more efficiently
    by Bioengineer on July 26, 2021 at 4:14 am

    Credit: University of Illinois/Technical University of Darmstadt Through a new award program, the U.S. National Science Foundation and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation, DFG) have joined forces to award the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and Technical University of Darmstadt a three-year $720,000 research grant ($500,000 from NSF) to explore opportunities to more efficiently produce

  • Which pharmaceutical companies have the most ointment dosed drugs?
    by DrugPatentWatch – Make Better Decisions on July 26, 2021 at 4:12 am

    This chart shows the pharmaceutical companies with the most ointment dosed drugs. For a different perspective, see the most popular dosage types. The companies with the most ointment dosed drugs… The post Which pharmaceutical companies have the most oi... The post Which pharmaceutical companies have the most ointment dosed drugs? appeared first on Biotechblog.

  • Extreme heat, dry summers main cause of tree death in Colorado’s subalpine forests
    by Bioengineer on July 26, 2021 at 4:04 am

    Credit: Robert Andrus Even in the absence of bark beetle outbreaks and wildfire, trees in Colorado subalpine forests are dying at increasing rates from warmer and drier summer conditions, found recent University of Colorado Boulder research. The study, published in the May print issue of the Journal of Ecology, also found that this trend is

  • New study sheds light on function of sex chromosomes in turtles
    by Bioengineer on July 26, 2021 at 12:41 am

    Credit: Nicole Valenzuela AMES, Iowa – A new study led by an Iowa State University scientist sheds light on how organisms have evolved to address imbalances in sex chromosomes. The study looks at a species of softshell turtle, but the results could help to illuminate an important evolutionary process in many species, said Nicole Valenzuela,

  • Which pharmaceutical companies have the most SPCs in Slovakia?
    by DrugPatentWatch – Make Better Decisions on July 25, 2021 at 4:12 am

    This chart shows the pharmaceutical companies with the most supplementary protection certificates (SPCs) in Slovakia. SPCs are used in European Union and select others to encourage pharmaceutical innovation by compensating… The post Which pharmaceutica... The post Which pharmaceutical companies have the most SPCs in Slovakia? appeared first on Biotechblog.

  • UC San Diego receives $35 million in state funding for new coastal research vessel
    by Bioengineer on July 24, 2021 at 4:24 am

    First-of-its-kind hydrogen-hybrid vessel will be vital to education and research Credit: Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego California legislators have allocated UC San Diego $35 million to design and build a new coastal research vessel with a first-of-its-kind hydrogen-hybrid propulsion system. The new vessel, which will be operated by Scripps Institution of Oceanography

  • New patent expiration for Allergan drug AVYCAZ
    by DrugPatentWatch – Make Better Decisions on July 24, 2021 at 4:15 am

    Annual Drug Patent Expirations for AVYCAZ Avycaz is a drug marketed by Allergan and is included in one NDA. It is available from one supplier. There are eight patents protecting… The post New patent expiration for Allergan drug AVYCAZ appeared first on... The post New patent expiration for Allergan drug AVYCAZ appeared first on Biotechblog.

  • New patent expiration for Otsuka drug ABILIFY
    by DrugPatentWatch – Make Better Decisions on July 24, 2021 at 4:15 am

    Annual Drug Patent Expirations for ABILIFY Abilify is a drug marketed by Otsuka and Otsuka Pharm Co Ltd and is included in six NDAs. It is available from two suppliers.… The post New patent expiration for Otsuka drug ABILIFY appeared first on DrugPaten... The post New patent expiration for Otsuka drug ABILIFY appeared first on Biotechblog.

  • Which pharmaceutical companies have the largest patent portfolios?
    by DrugPatentWatch – Make Better Decisions on July 24, 2021 at 4:15 am

    A strong patent portfolio is at the core of branded pharmaceutical firms. Accordingly, one way to assess the relative strength of pharmaceutical firms is to compare their patent-counts. This chart… The post Which pharmaceutical companies have the large... The post Which pharmaceutical companies have the largest patent portfolios? appeared first on Biotechblog.

  • Sharks, lies, and videotape: Scientists document problems with Shark Week
    by Bioengineer on July 23, 2021 at 11:16 pm

    Credit: Marion Kraschl, CC BY 3.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0, via Wikimedia Commons MEADVILLE, PA – July 22, 2021 – Shark Week is many things. First and foremost, it’s a week of shark-themed documentary programming on the Discovery Channel. Now in its 33rd year, it’s the longest-running cable event in history. It’s the biggest audience that marine biologists

  • Study shows environmental link to herbicide-resistant horseweed
    by Bioengineer on July 23, 2021 at 11:07 pm

    Credit: Photo by John A. Schramski WESTMINSTER, Colorado – July 23, 2021 – Horseweed is a serious threat to both agricultural crops and natural landscapes around the globe. In the U.S., the weed is prolific and able to emerge at any time of the year. Fall emerging horseweed overwinters as a rosette, while spring emerging

  • Novel degrader of cancer-driving protein AKT slows prostate, breast tumors in mice
    by Arlene Weintraub on July 23, 2021 at 1:08 pm

    Novel degrader of cancer-driving protein AKT slows prostate, breast tumors in mice arlene.weintraub Fri, 07/23/2021 - 09:08

  • UPDATE: Half of Adverum pipeline 'snaps out of existence' as adverse events force pivot to more common eye disease
    by Nick Paul on July 23, 2021 at 9:37 am

    UPDATE: Half of Adverum pipeline 'snaps out of existence' as adverse events force pivot to more common eye disease ntaylor Fri, 07/23/2021 - 05:37

  • Lumos delays key hormone deficiency readout as COVID bites
    by Nick Paul on July 23, 2021 at 8:49 am

    Lumos delays key hormone deficiency readout as COVID bites ntaylor Fri, 07/23/2021 - 04:49

  • Eli Lilly pens pact with Banner Alzheimer's Institute for ‘virtual approach’ for its late-stage donanemab test
    by Ben Adams on July 23, 2021 at 8:19 am

    Eli Lilly pens pact with Banner Alzheimer's Institute for ‘virtual approach’ for its late-stage donanemab test badams Fri, 07/23/2021 - 04:19

  • Seres Therapeutics’ microbiome therapy flops against placebo as shares go into freefall
    by Ben Adams on July 22, 2021 at 11:32 am

    Seres Therapeutics’ microbiome therapy flops against placebo as shares go into freefall badams Thu, 07/22/2021 - 07:32

  • Roche in ‘continued dialogue’ with FDA over Alzheimer’s prospect; culls early-stage assets in Q2 clearout
    by Nick Paul on July 22, 2021 at 10:34 am

    Roche in ‘continued dialogue’ with FDA over Alzheimer’s prospect; culls early-stage assets in Q2 clearout ntaylor Thu, 07/22/2021 - 06:34

  • New gene therapy approach shows signs of preventing vision loss from glaucoma
    by Kyle LaHucik on July 21, 2021 at 6:26 pm

    New gene therapy approach shows signs of preventing vision loss from glaucoma klahucik Wed, 07/21/2021 - 14:26

  • AbbVie, Roche top data transparency list, but more could be done to build trust in medical system: report
    by Annalee Armstrong on July 21, 2021 at 1:05 pm

    AbbVie, Roche top data transparency list, but more could be done to build trust in medical system: report aarmstrong Wed, 07/21/2021 - 09:05

  • Hemab raises $55M to target multiple rare bleeding indications
    by Nick Paul on July 21, 2021 at 12:43 pm

    Hemab raises $55M to target multiple rare bleeding indications ntaylor Wed, 07/21/2021 - 08:43

  • Vedanta raises $68M, reveals setback to Bristol Myers alliance
    by Nick Paul on July 21, 2021 at 12:16 pm

    Vedanta raises $68M, reveals setback to Bristol Myers alliance ntaylor Wed, 07/21/2021 - 08:16

  • Coave raises $25M ahead of pivotal retinal gene therapy trial
    by Nick Paul on July 21, 2021 at 11:26 am

    Coave raises $25M ahead of pivotal retinal gene therapy trial ntaylor Wed, 07/21/2021 - 07:26

  • Novartis ditches midstage dry eye drug, gets New Year’s PDUFA data for troubled Leqvio
    by Ben Adams on July 21, 2021 at 8:41 am

    Novartis ditches midstage dry eye drug, gets New Year’s PDUFA data for troubled Leqvio badams Wed, 07/21/2021 - 04:41

  • Bayer's drug that turns a cancer-protective pathway toxic eradicates breast tumors in mice
    by Angus Liu on July 21, 2021 at 8:40 am

    Bayer's drug that turns a cancer-protective pathway toxic eradicates breast tumors in mice aliu Wed, 07/21/2021 - 04:40

  • What the EU’s Single-Use Plastics Ban Means for the Bioplastics Industry
    by Helen Albert on July 21, 2021 at 6:00 am

    A European directive banning a range of single-use plastics came into law this month. How are the new regulations impacting industrial biotech companies developing bioplastics? In an attempt to reduce staggeringly high levels of plastic pollution seen around the world, particularly in marine environments, the 27 EU member states and Norway agreed in 2019 to restrict ‘single-use plastics’ from being produced and sold in the EU. The countries were given two years to implement the new regulations outlined in the 2019 directive and it officially became part of European law in July this year. The directive restricts the sale and use of 10 single-use plastic items including cutlery, plates, straws, drink stirrers, sticks for balloons, cups, food and drink containers made of expanded polystyrene. The idea is to move towards a circular economy – with a focus on reusing and recycling materials – as set out in the EU’s circular economy action plan. The European Commission is one of the first lawmakers to bring in strict legislation around plastic pollution. The post What the EU’s Single-Use Plastics Ban Means for the Bioplastics Industry appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • Danish Dementia Startup Launches Amid Maturing Nordic Biotech Scene
    by Victor Kotsev on July 20, 2021 at 1:30 pm

    Muna Therapeutics debuted with the Danish biotech sector’s biggest-ever Series A round earlier this month. This showcases the rapid growth taking place in the biotech industry in the Nordic region. Muna Therapeutics’ €62M ($73M) investment was co-led by the Danish investor Novo Holdings through its early-stage arm Novo Seeds. The startup was first set up by Novo last year and merged with the Belgian neurodegenerative disease firm K5 Therapeutics, leading to the launch of Muna’s newest incarnation. Muna — whose name means ‘to remember’ in Old Norse — has a big focus on treating Alzheimer’s disease. The frequently-debated amyloid hypothesis attributes this complex condition to the buildup of a protein called amyloid-beta in the brain. However, some people with a buildup of amyloid-beta in their brains develop symptoms quickly, while others do not.  According to Muna CEO Rita Balice-Gordon, the firm is investigating the reason for this discrepancy as it could be key to understanding both how the disease progresses and possible mechanisms of resisting the disease. To that purpose, The post Danish Dementia Startup Launches Amid Maturing Nordic Biotech Scene appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • Rivus’ fat-trimming therapy nabs $35M to harness our own biology against a host of diseases
    by Ben Adams on July 20, 2021 at 1:10 pm

    Rivus’ fat-trimming therapy nabs $35M to harness our own biology against a host of diseases badams Tue, 07/20/2021 - 09:10

  • In an unusual crossover, Gilead hires Arcus CMO Grossman, putting him in charge of cancer pact with his former biotech
    by Nick Paul on July 20, 2021 at 11:54 am

    In an unusual crossover, Gilead hires Arcus CMO Grossman, putting him in charge of cancer pact with his former biotech ntaylor Tue, 07/20/2021 - 07:54

  • Panakès moves into biotech investing with new €150M fund
    by Nick Paul on July 20, 2021 at 11:28 am

    Panakès moves into biotech investing with new €150M fund ntaylor Tue, 07/20/2021 - 07:28

  • Ardelyx stock craters as FDA slaps biotech with dreaded ‘deficiencies’ tag on kidney drug
    by Ben Adams on July 20, 2021 at 10:48 am

    Ardelyx stock craters as FDA slaps biotech with dreaded ‘deficiencies’ tag on kidney drug badams Tue, 07/20/2021 - 06:48

  • Using AI to Select the Right Disease Model for Cancer Drug Development
    by Sudha Sundaram on July 20, 2021 at 8:00 am

    Researchers looking to cure cancer are constantly searching for disease models that closely resemble human physiology for testing cancer-fighting drugs. Artificial Intelligence (AI) can help researchers sift through large amounts of available data, saving time and costs, to source the most appropriate disease model for oncology drug development. In early drug development stages, the choice of the disease model used for drug discovery and drug testing can make or break a study. Drugs are only approved for studies in humans based on satisfactory safety and efficacy outcomes from experiments conducted using specific models. This ultimately leads to market approvals for commercializing the drug and helps deliver an optimized product for patients in need. Using the ‘wrong’ model can be costly for a drug discovery project for multiple reasons. First, disease models themselves can be expensive to source, leaving scientists with less margin for error during selection because study budgets are often limited at this stage. Second, characteristics of the chosen model, including specific mutations or biological pathways, can heavily influence the efficacy of a drug. The post Using AI to Select the Right Disease Model for Cancer Drug Development appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • Surprise genetic discovery in macular degeneration points to new treatment strategy
    by Arlene Weintraub on July 19, 2021 at 12:57 pm

    Surprise genetic discovery in macular degeneration points to new treatment strategy arlene.weintraub Mon, 07/19/2021 - 08:57

  • How to Protect Your Intellectual Property as a Biotech Startup
    by Mark Zipkin on July 19, 2021 at 6:00 am

    Biotechs always start with great scientific ideas, but if you can’t protect them, you can’t see them through to execution. Companies need to start developing long-term intellectual property strategies almost as early as they are devising the ideas that need protecting. Experts say that the right intellectual property (IP) strategy for a new biotech depends on the source IP, the timing of the discoveries, the potential applications of the technology, and how creative the  company can be within the competitive landscape.  Broad to narrow “At the very beginning, try to understand the promise and breadth of a particular idea,” says Leda Trivinos, Partner at US Life Sciences VC Flagship Pioneering, who focuses on IP protection. Flagship’s portfolio includes messenger RNA company Moderna Therapeutics and three biotechs that have had their initial public offerings (IPOs) in the past year: Foghorn Therapeutics, Sigilon Therapeutics, and Sana Biotechnology. Flagship’s approach to company formation means foundational IP is developed in-house by researchers and entrepreneurs with experience developing an idea with commercial potential. The post How to Protect Your Intellectual Property as a Biotech Startup appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • Multi-Million UK Life Sciences Initiative Welcomed By VC Firms
    by Anita Chakraverty on July 16, 2021 at 10:23 am

    Biotech venture capital firms across Europe have warmly received the launch of a €235M (£200M) UK government initiative to support the growth of promising late-stage life sciences companies. The UK’s Life Sciences Investment Programme opened to applications from fund managers this month, with the aim of providing €235M in late-stage capital and attracting at least €469M (£400M) more in private investment.  The program sets out to compensate for the scarcity of science-focused venture capital (VC) and other funds in the UK that support late-stage companies, broadly defined as those raising a Series B and later. Funding will be made through British Patient Capital (BPC) – the commercial arm of the government-owned British Business Bank that invests in venture and growth equity. The bank intends to contribute between €59M (£50M) and €117M (£100M) to funds with a minimum target size of €293M (£250M), providing up to 33% of the total commitment alongside private investors.  In addition, the Life Sciences Investment Programme expects to channel investments from the United Arab Emirates’ The post Multi-Million UK Life Sciences Initiative Welcomed By VC Firms appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • EMA Market Approval Rate for Small Biotechs Skyrocketed Last Year
    by Victor Kotsev on July 14, 2021 at 1:23 pm

    The success rate for small biotechs applying for regulatory approval from the EMA has risen by over 100% since 2016, which analysts partly attribute to increased access to sophisticated technology and funding. According to a recent announcement from the EMA, the regulator greenlit a whopping 89% of applications for marketing authorization for new medicines from a micro-, small-, or medium-sized enterprise (SME) applicant last year. This figure dwarfs the 40% success rate for SMEs in 2016. In 2020, 16 medicines developed by SMEs were approved by the EMA, of which half are treatments for rare diseases. This accounts for a fifth of last year’s EMA approvals of medicines for human use. “SMEs play an important role in the development of new and innovative therapies in Europe and we are extremely pleased to see the increasing number of smaller companies bringing new medicines to market,” said Rafaèle Tordjman, founder of Jeito Capital, a Paris-based venture capital fund focused on biotech and biopharma.  The EMA classifies a company as an SME based on a range of criteria such as having up to 250 employees and an annual turnover of up to €50M. The post EMA Market Approval Rate for Small Biotechs Skyrocketed Last Year appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • 5 Easy DIY Biology Experiments You Can Do at Home
    by Clara Rodríguez Fernández on July 14, 2021 at 8:50 am

    Here are five easy DIY biology experiments to have fun at home without the need for expensive laboratory equipment. Biology is fascinating, but not all of us have access to state-of-the-art laboratory equipment to do biology experiments. However, it is possible to do some simple experiments at home with the right materials. These DIY biology experiments are suitable for all ages and levels of knowledge. The main goal is to have fun with science and get curious. To be on the safe side, the list doesn’t include genetic engineering experiments; in many countries, you are not allowed to perform them in uncertified facilities. If you are very keen, though, some people have been able to get their homes certified to create genetically modified microbes. 1. Extract your own DNA It is very easy to extract DNA at home just using everyday kitchen supplies. You can extract your own DNA from your saliva, or you can use any fruit or vegetable you can find at home — The post 5 Easy DIY Biology Experiments You Can Do at Home appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • How Human-induced Pluripotent Stem Cells are Revolutionizing Drug Discovery
    by External Contributor on July 14, 2021 at 8:00 am

    Drug discovery is a resource-intensive process riddled with high failure rates. A lack of good preclinical models often results in identified drug candidates showing poor efficacy in human clinical trials. Cells derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) better recapitulate the pathophysiology of human diseases and are quickly becoming the go-to tool for disease modeling and drug testing.  Drug discovery and development are frequently associated with skyrocketing costs, which are often attributed to the high failure rates in the drug discovery process. For instance, 90% of identified drug candidates do not even pass phase I clinical trials. The main reason is the use of preclinical models that do not properly recapitulate human responses to drugs.  Conventionally used preclinical models include animals, such as rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, non-human primates, including monkeys, and chimpanzees, as well as primary human differentiated cells. Malathi Raman, Senior Product Manager of Stem Cells, Takara Bio Europe “There is a lack of good preclinical models that accurately predict human drug response,” explained Malathi Raman, The post How Human-induced Pluripotent Stem Cells are Revolutionizing Drug Discovery appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • Sofinnova Taps into Italian Gene Therapy with Three Seed Financings
    by Anita Chakraverty on July 12, 2021 at 1:53 pm

    The French investor Sofinnova Partners has injected a total of €6M into three Italian gene therapy companies, cementing Italy’s reputation as a European center for cell and gene therapies.  Last month, the venture capitalist Sofinnova Partners used its Telethon fund to inject cash into AAVantgarde Bio, Borea Therapeutics, and Alia Therapeutics. The three firms will share a total of €6M in seed funding to fuel the development of treatments for rare inherited diseases. Sofinnova’s move follows a €20M injection through the same fund last year in three other early-stage Italian gene therapy companies – Genespire, Epsilen Bio, and PinCell.  Sofinnova’s Telethon Fund is the largest investment pot for biotechnology in Italy and was set up in 2018 with the Telethon Foundation charity, which has been supporting research into new treatments for rare and genetic disorders for the past 30 years. Sofinnova Partners’ Managing Partner Graziano Seghezzi told me Italy was a hub of excellence in gene therapy due to long-term support from the charity. The country has many startups due to the abundance of biotech researchers and academics and a strong tradition of excellence in science education. The post Sofinnova Taps into Italian Gene Therapy with Three Seed Financings appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • The Hidden Role of Biobanks in Covid-19 Research
    by Carlos de Rojas on July 12, 2021 at 6:00 am

    Biobanks have played a key role in the fight against Covid-19 by allowing researchers to access the samples they needed to study the disease and develop vaccines and treatments. While the pandemic presented a big challenge to the often underfunded biobanks, it also provided an opportunity for growth in many other areas of research going forward. Without samples from patients infected with Covid-19, it would have been unachievable to make the genome of the SARS-CoV-2 virus genome accessible to the entire scientific community and develop effective vaccines in record times. Since the start of the pandemic, the research community has been consistently requesting these samples to conduct experiments to understand the diverse mechanisms that the virus uses to trick our immune systems.  The guardians of these samples are biobanks. These are centers that are able to collect, store and distribute large amounts of human samples for medical research purposes. In the face of the Covid-19 pandemic, biobanks coordinated with the global scientific community, reorganizing their activities to perform a fundamental role in the battle against the new pathogen.  The post The Hidden Role of Biobanks in Covid-19 Research appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • The Top European Biotech Funding Rounds in June
    by Jonathan Smith on July 8, 2021 at 10:57 am

    While oncology and psychedelics dominated European biotech’s biggest funding rounds last month, startup seed financing focused more on gene therapy and drug discovery. Last month saw some momentous events for Europe’s biotech heavyweights. GSK paid an impressive €524M ($625M) upfront to co-develop an immuno-oncology candidate with iTeos Therapeutics in Belgium. Meanwhile, the German antibody drug giant MorphoSys took over Constellation Pharmaceuticals in the US for €1.4B ($1.7B) to get hold of experimental epigenetic drugs for cancer.  On the flip side, we saw the termination of a €1.3B ($1.6B) licensing agreement between Johnson & Johnson and the Dutch biotech argenx that aimed to co-develop a treatment for a form of blood cancer. The big pharma said its decision to pull the plug was based on the drug’s data and on the changing standard of care in blood cancer. In terms of financing last month, European biotech companies raised over €1.2B in 45 rounds, which include private rounds and initial public offerings (IPOs). As might be expected, The post The Top European Biotech Funding Rounds in June appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • Three Lessons an Investor Can Learn from Biotech Entrepreneurs
    by Antoine Papiernik on July 7, 2021 at 6:00 am

    Sofinnova Partners’ Chairman and Managing Partner, Antoine Papiernik, describes his company’s ‘Wall of Fame’ showcasing its entrepreneurs and how their years of experience provide a source of inspiration for venture capitalists.  Every time I walk through our Paris office, I am greeted by a wall of photos showcasing some of the top entrepreneurial minds that we have had the privilege to partner with. Their portraits, each as unique as their accomplishments, are a striking reminder of why I do what I do and quite literally, frame several important lessons in my career.  If you turn the portrait of one of our entrepreneurial luminaries around, it reveals a surprising juxtaposition — a hidden photo of the same man, taken decades ago when he was a rebellious youth playing rock and roll.  This surprising juxtaposition is a lesson in itself, that a spirit of disruption is often needed to find success in building startups. Who else but someone who marches to the beat of their own drum would have the audacity to look at a problem that thousands might have already examined and exclaim, The post Three Lessons an Investor Can Learn from Biotech Entrepreneurs appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • How a CDMO Alliance Sets New Standards for Drug Development and Commercialization
    by Ute Boronowsky on July 6, 2021 at 8:00 am

    To speed up drug development and commercialization, most biotechs partner with contract development and manufacturing organizations (CDMOs). Often though, they need to coordinate their project with more than one CDMO, as workflows have become increasingly complex. Recently, two companies have set up a CDMO alliance to simplify these processes for their biotech clients and make their lives easier. As the share of biopharmaceuticals and other complex therapeutics in new drug development projects continues to grow, so does the need for professional manufacturing and commercialization support. CDMOs usually specialize in individual steps of the drug development workflow to deliver the highest quality possible. The downside for the biotech clients is that they need to partner with more than one CDMO, increasing their workload and potential risks.  Introducing a new CDMO alliance In mid-2020, two globally operating CDMOs, both headquartered in Germany, decided to set new standards to facilitate project coordination for their clients. Building on their shared interest in better serving customers and achieving high quality, Rentschler Biopharma and Vetter formed an alliance to streamline their drug development and manufacturing processes.  The post How a CDMO Alliance Sets New Standards for Drug Development and Commercialization appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • Why the Right Team is Key for Biotech Success
    by External Contributor on July 5, 2021 at 8:30 am

    For any startup, and especially for biotechnology startups, success depends on three main factors: science, financing, and people. One of the key factors investors look for is having a management team that can raise money and make good use of it to advance the science of the company. According to Sinclair Dunlop, Managing Partner at Epidarex Capital, “a critical success factor in any life science investment is the management team. The sourcing, development, and retention of experienced talent has a direct impact on technology development and investor returns. A significant challenge, particularly in under-ventured markets, is a shortage of serial CEOs with a track record of fundraising at scale.” Gathering the right team Venture capital firms searching for investment opportunities pay a lot of attention to the management team at the head of a company. Specifically, for an early-stage biotech startup, the management team needs to be able to transition from a scientific-oriented into a patient and business-oriented one. As a result, biotechnology companies must focus on translating research results into patient benefits and revenue potential. The post Why the Right Team is Key for Biotech Success appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • Poxel’s Diabetes Drug Wins Japan Nod, But Competition Remains Fierce
    by Anita Chakraverty on July 2, 2021 at 11:15 am

    As French biotech Poxel marks the first market approval of its oral type 2 diabetes medication in Japan, eyes turn to the future of this drug and its rivals in Europe and the US. The fortunes of the Lyon-based Poxel have been boosted by the first-ever regulatory approval of its oral type 2 diabetes medication imeglimin hydrochloride, which is marketed as Twymeeg in Japan. Elsewhere, however, the drug’s future remains less clear.  The approval of imeglimin was based on three phase III trials, where the drug helped patients to control their blood glucose. The nod triggered a €13.3M milestone payment from Poxel’s Japanese partner company Sumitomo Dainippon Pharma, in a €213M plus deal that will include sales-based payments and escalating double-digit royalties following the drug’s expected launch in October. The good news comes after the company took a bruising late last year when its US and European partner Roivant pulled out of a licensing and development deal for the drug following a strategic review. Rights subsequently reverted to Poxel in January and, The post Poxel’s Diabetes Drug Wins Japan Nod, But Competition Remains Fierce appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • GSK Raises Eyebrows in Checkpoint Inhibitor Megadeal with iTeos
    by Victor Kotsev on June 30, 2021 at 4:15 pm

    Analysts are abuzz over GSK’s co-development deal with immuno-oncology specialist iTeos Therapeutics earlier this month, wondering if it overpaid for the Belgian company’s next-generation checkpoint inhibitor.  GSK’s oncology deal with iTeos earlier this month centered on an antibody drug that blocks an immune checkpoint called TIGIT. The candidate is currently in phase I testing for advanced solid tumors. The megadeal was worth €524M ($625M) upfront, as well as more than €1.2M ($1.4B) if developmental milestones are met.  The hefty price tag reflects a recent spike in interest in TIGIT as an immune checkpoint target for cancer immunotherapies. Last month, US-based Agenus signed a similar deal with Bristol Myers Squibb for $200M (€168M) upfront. “TIGIT remains a speculative target today,” said Bertrand Delsuc, CEO and founder of the business intelligence firm Biotech Radar. “[I]t is likely GSK somewhat overpaid here.”  However, Delsuc also observed that big cash is needed to secure deals in this increasingly competitive field. The post GSK Raises Eyebrows in Checkpoint Inhibitor Megadeal with iTeos appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • Scotland’s Top Ten Biotech Companies to Watch Out For
    by Jonathan Smith on June 30, 2021 at 10:13 am

    Scotland has a thriving life sciences ecosystem with strengths in oncology, genetic engineering, and industrial biotech. Let’s pick up the bagpipes as we tour the top ten companies driving the region’s biotech scene. Scotland is the UK’s second-most populous country, boasting picturesque scenery, a rich history, and a strong focus on sustainability. There is a diverse range of biotech startups in the region, with specialists in cell therapy, antimicrobials, industrial biotech, and more.  One big name with its roots in Scotland was Synpromics, a gene therapy firm that was snapped up by the US company AskBio in 2019, which in turn was acquired by Bayer for €3.5B last year. Meanwhile, the Oxford-based drug discovery company Exscientia, which raised a mammoth €434.9M ($525M) earlier this year, began its life as a spinout from the University of Dundee. Historically, local biotech companies have thrived with support from organizations such as the EU, the governmental agency Scottish Enterprise, and Innovate UK. Life sciences funders tapping into the region’s expertise in the last year include the UK-US venture capital firm Epidarex, The post Scotland’s Top Ten Biotech Companies to Watch Out For appeared first on Labiotech.eu. © Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Labiotech UG and Labiotech.eu with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

  • Announcing DIYbiosphere: an open source project to connect DIYbio related activities worldwide
    by Jason Bobe on March 17, 2018 at 10:53 am

    With significant growth in activities globally, our /local page has strained to keep up and simply is not a great...

  • DIYbio events for the week of September 3
    by scstowell on September 3, 2017 at 8:29 pm

    Here are your events for the week Sunday, September 3 Oakland, CA, USA – Open Insulin Lab Day  Work on...

  • DIYbio events for the remainder of the week of August 27
    by scstowell on August 28, 2017 at 4:30 am

    Here are your events for the remainder of the week Monday, August 28 Oakland, CA, USA – Plant Bio Group...

  • DIYbio events for the week of August 20
    by scstowell on August 18, 2017 at 4:34 am

    Here are your DIYbio events for the week Sunday, August 20 Cincinnati, OH, USA – Science Book Club – The...

  • DIYbio events for remainder of the week of August 13
    by scstowell on August 14, 2017 at 1:22 am

    Here are your DIYbio events for the remainder of the week Monday, August 14 Brooklyn, NY, USA – Biotextiles: Grow...

  • DIYbio Events for the week of August 6
    by scstowell on August 1, 2017 at 4:49 pm

    Here are your events for the week. Sunday, August 6 Brooklyn, NY, USA – Biotech Crash Course Introductory intense hands-on...

  • DIYbio events for the week of July 30
    by scstowell on July 28, 2017 at 3:29 am

    Here are your DIYbio events for the week of July 30 Sunday, July 30 Brooklyn, NY, USA – Summer Ferments  ...

  • DIYbio events for remainder of the week of January 8
    by scstowell on January 8, 2017 at 9:01 pm

    Here are your DIYbio events for remainder of the week Monday, January 9 Brooklyn, NY, USA Open Night: PCR &...

  • DIYbio events for the week of October 16
    by scstowell on October 13, 2016 at 3:43 pm

    Here are your DIYbio events for the week On Sunday Durham has Edward Richards giving a talk  “Current Issues In...

  • DIYbio events for the week of October 9
    by scstowell on October 9, 2016 at 5:40 pm

    Here are your DIYbio events for the week. On Sunday, Brooklyn begins its Biotechnology Crash Course, Cambridge has a series...